You Winning Life

Ep.174-Emotional Intelligence In The Workplace with Juan Luis Betancourt

March 04, 2024 Jason Wasser, LMFT Season 1 Episode 174
You Winning Life
Ep.174-Emotional Intelligence In The Workplace with Juan Luis Betancourt
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Embark on a journey of discovery with Juan Luis Betancourt, the visionary CEO of Human Intelligence, as we unravel the intricate tapestry of leadership, cultural heritage, and the transformative role of emotional intelligence in the modern workplace. Feel the weight of history in Juan's stories, where the echoes of the Cuban revolution provide a stark backdrop for understanding today's global challenges. His insights bridge the personal and the professional, offering a roadmap for navigating adversity with resilience and speaking out against injustices with courage. This episode is a masterclass in turning personal trials into triumphs, and understanding how our backgrounds shape the leaders we become.

As we traverse the landscape of company culture and innovation, prepare to have your preconceptions challenged. We dissect the myth of a monolithic corporate culture, armed with insights from Don Sull's enlightening research, and illustrate how emotional intelligence can be woven into the very fabric of our daily work interactions through cutting-edge AI and psychometric assessments. This conversation is more than just an exploration; it's an invitation to transform how we communicate, collaborate, and cultivate diverse cultures within our organizations. With Juan's pioneering perspective, learn why a one-size-fits-all approach to culture falls short, and how embracing the complexities of human dynamics can lead to genuine engagement and unprecedented success.

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Jason Wasser Therapist/Coach
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The Family Room Wellness Associates
Certified Neuro Emotional Technique Practitioner 
🎧Host:You Winning Life Podcast
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Speaker 1:

This is the you Winning Life podcast your number one source for mastering a positive existence. Each episode will be interviewing exceptional people giving you empowering insights and guiding you to extraordinary outcomes. Learn from specialists in the worlds of integrative and natural wellness, spirituality, psychology and entrepreneurship so you, too, can be winning life. Now here's your host licensed marriage and family therapist, certified neuro emotional technique practitioner and certified entrepreneur coach, jason Wasser.

Speaker 2:

Hey everybody, welcome back to the you Winning Life podcast. As always, if you are getting any value out of our episodes, please do me a favor and follow us on Instagram you Winning Life or Jason Wasser LMFT. Most of the stuff now is on my main one, jason Wasser LMFT and also please subscribe and share out the episodes if you think anybody else would benefit from it. Today's guest is Juan Luis Bentecourt. He is CEO with really amazing background. He has worked for companies such as Procter Gamble, reebok, puma, andy Cthulon. He has a MBA from the Wharton School, an MA in international management from the Lauderd Institute, both at University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor's degree in economics from Harvard University. Juan Luis is also the board member of the Miami Theater Center and on the Wharton and Harvard Alumni Association in South Florida. He is now the CEO and founder of Human Intelligence, which takes AI tech and psychological assessments to help businesses, companies and teams work better from a deeper understanding of how to collaborate and understand the motivations and insights of partnership, team collaboration and leadership.

Speaker 2:

Juan, welcome to the show. So all right. So very much, as you guys are excited to be hanging out with Juan and we're just going to go right for the jugular because he and I just had a massively intense and amazing conversation, pre-gaming everything. And I want to give a caveat heads up, because he and I were just debating this that you know, some people hear topics in the first few minutes of a podcast and they shut it off and they become disinterested. And what I want to challenge everybody is is that Juan is going to share an incredibly important part of himself, part of his background, part of his culture, part of what inspires him to be and do what he is and what he is doing now and how.

Speaker 2:

Right off the bat, we may not see the relevancy to the impact that it can have on the greater conversation. So I challenge you for the first five to ten minutes of this conversation, not to be disinterested, not to fast forward and not to shut off the episode. But, juan, first of all, thank you so much for hanging out with us today. Thanks, jason, for having me. So you and I have gotten to know each other more than a little, but not as much as we both would like over the last two months. And what we were just talking about is what's going on in the world, obviously, with Hamas and the terrorism in Israel and the war that has been happening, and we were talking about the shared atrocities in the world that people turned a blind eye to, and you started talking about your Cuban background, so you shared this idea that people either A turn a blind eye or very quick to forget about things, and I'd love to start off the conversation with why that topic is so important and impactful to you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so I am Cuban American. Both my parents are from Cuba, left during 1960 when Fidel Castro took power. And you know, in a way I relate to the Israeli situation where people want others to speak up and I see the frustration when people don't for Israelis and Jews Because, similarly, when Cuba, which was a flourishing country, largest middle class in the world, they had trains before the US by. Think about seven years that air conditioned me. For the US, I mean, it was a very wealthy country. There's no, nobody was leaving Cuba from the US, let's put it that way, for 400 years, from 1508 to 1960. We're talking 400 years. There's no documentation of any poor, middle class, rich person coming to Cuba, to the US, to live a better life. Right, they would come and do business, but go back to Cuba.

Speaker 3:

One man, batista, the president at the time in 59, was a corrupt guy and bringing the mafia to Cuba, and so the rich basically Fidel Castro was part of the rich class said let's get rid of this guy. And they all financed Fidel Castro. The rich did not communist. The rich my family included in almost every rich Cuban family that left financed him to do a revolution to get rid of the dictator Batista. Unfortunately, we didn't know that Fidel had other plans and the many took power. He killed three of the four generals who won all the battles. He put 50,000 people in jail and he killed over 15,000 people. So, similar to, you know, israel losing 1500 people just in the initial attack from our mosque, fidel Castro, in literally a week, did more damage than that to his own country, and it's tantamount not only of killing your own people and putting them in jail.

Speaker 3:

He also then changed the system of a capitalistic, wonderful society with a middle class and highly educated right, if you lived in Latin America and Mexico, argentina, brazil, you went to medical school in Havana, you went to ball school in Havana. You would never go anywhere else. You would go to Cuba for education. That's not the case today. And so this is a great society and all of a sudden, one guy kills all these people.

Speaker 3:

And imagine if BB Netanyahu says hey, everyone, I'm now Hamas and we're going to make the Jews Muslim, like that would be crazy. Well, that's what happened, and no one in the world even lifted a finger. And worse, when all the educated children of these families left Cuba, went to go invade Cuba, with US support, john F Kennedy who, in the US perspective, as a great leader among Cubans, they can't stand them because he said he would help and give air cover. That way no American lives would be lost. And he pulled out last minute with 20,000 Cuban citizens who had been training for six, seven years they were all PhD doctors, the most educated people in the world left on the beach to get slaughtered and put in jail for the next 40 years.

Speaker 3:

Right, and did anybody in the US care? So to this day, nobody cares about that Cuban story. Nobody cares about what was the greatest country for 350 years. Nobody cares. And it helps me put in perspective this really situation and the Hamas situation and the Palestinian context to not say things without learning more, without understanding his culture and ethnicities and history. The world's a big place and there's over 250 country, probably 10,000 tribes in those countries. I don't know much about all of them and it saddens me that not everybody knows enough about things outside their own country, let alone Israel or Cuba or Rwanda or Bagan and all these other places.

Speaker 2:

And I know that just from a psychological perspective, how people choose not to. No, they choose to turn a blind eye. And we're seeing this and whatever it may be right, where, whether what's going on, if not only turning a blind eye but also justifying evil, justifying these things, whether it's about money, whether it's about politics, right, whether it's like, oh, I agree with, like some things that they may believe, but therefore I'm gonna excuse everything else I see this becoming a universal. We see this in society, like with cancel culture and with everything else, and, as you and I talked about, like I'm a card carrying Democrat, but yet you and I right we may, you and I both look at every single news website. We look at things from different perspectives. We read books of people we disagree with. That's a lost art.

Speaker 3:

That's a lost way to have conversations. I think people can say they voted for both Democrat and Republican in their life Me, you. I've done that and somehow whenever I meet other people who've done that, I get along a lot better with them because they seem more open to just open-minded, to talking about different perspectives. I don't agree with all of my friends on politics, but I can listen to them and agree to disagree, and that art has been lost and that's why we're in such a bad situation, not only in the US but globally.

Speaker 2:

Right and now taking this as an inspiration for what you're doing professionally. I mean coming from your story as Cuban background and the immigrant family story and by all means, your story is truly a success story in so many regards, and not only that, right From the academic side, from the business side to having a family right, being involved in charitable organizations and now having influence on other people's lives. This idea of talking about what we're talking about with leadership that took over to destroy and you making a mission in your life to have leadership to uplift and connect, has become a central part of what you've been trying to create, especially with your newest and venture human intelligence.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, after 25 years working quote to make money, to get to the right titles, my career took a change or a turn to be really purpose-based and driven through energy from spirituality, and we've talked about it in the past. But I no longer was beholden to companies and I launched my own company and I could explore other things, such as a modality of meditation that the US government, through the Supreme Court, made legal in 2006, called ayahuasca. It's a way of under the freedom of religion. It's a way of deep meditation. It's misunderstood by many, but it's actually a legal experience.

Speaker 3:

That's kind of a form of spirituality and religion to the US government where you can access, like through meditation, higher consciousness and understanding about yourself, others and the way the world works. And so through that, I launched human intelligence to give back to the world and to help the world connect and for every person to be more self-aware, every person to be more emotionally intelligent, to connect with others and to do it in the place where that's lost, which is the workplace, especially now in a distributed workplace. Human intelligence helps people connect and collaborate and be more productive where everyone's more engaged and happy, and we reduce friction from writing emails to being in meetings and it makes work more enjoyable when you're able to do that and we're leading the charge in that and being really innovative around how we do that.

Speaker 2:

Let's take it just another few minutes on what that looks like, because I got to see the back end. You've been gracious enough to allow me to use it and to start using it with some of my clients, and you and I talked about different personality tests and lenses, and you know my love with the Enneagram personality style. When someone is, you know, and the beauty of what you've created can be now eventually, hopefully which is part of our conversations how it could be applied to other scenarios outside of the entrepreneur and business world. But I just want people to understand a little bit more of what you're trying to do and the tools you're using when that's happening through this platform.

Speaker 3:

Aliborate on that question please.

Speaker 2:

So people are coming in using human intelligence, companies are using this right and there's assessments, there's tests, there's interactive when you're on a Zoom call. There's ways of community right, there's icons and emojis and reminders.

Speaker 3:

Oh, so it's only the use cases.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the use cases and some of the ways that, like, because it's a tech company, it's a psych using psychology, right? These are very generic, right, so let's go a little bit deeper. Like so, if I right, the average company. So yeah, so right, okay.

Speaker 3:

So I'll give you the conceptual description and then the actual use case Beautiful. So essentially, we go to Mark and say we have taken an industry of 50 years called psychometric tools or psychometric personality assessments. So picture predictive index, string finders, berkman, kaliper, hogan, shl there's all these batteries of personality tests. The problem with the $3 billion spent on those tools up until now is you take it, you do a workshop with your team or with a coach or psychologist, and it's a one and done, and you never really think about it again. And even if you do remember everything, those are the 10 people. It's not the 5,000 other people in your company you're working with, and so that's been a problem. And so what we did was we took an assessment tool with technology and APIs. We embedded it in all of your workflows and all of your current collaboration tools, like Microsoft Teams, outlook, g Suite, slack, zoom, and then sprinkled on it now with AI. So the following could happen like Grammarly, which did not come up with anything new in terms of content they did not invent the source or the dictionary or how to write better, and there are millions of teachers of grammar and English around the world All Grammarly did to become a $15 billion company, was put those insights and that content where it matters, where you need it, at the time of need in your workflow in the email, in the Word doc. We did the same with Psychometric. So you take our test, give it to 5,000 people so you send the link to 5,000 employees. For example, at Coca-Cola uses this on a Monday and when they open up their Outlook. One use case is they open up an email and if I'm writing to you, jason I've never met you and I'm asking for a proposal for your approval or for a budget, I will click a button in my email as I'm writing and it will suggest how to write the email better for you. If I'm very conceptual and high level and decisive, I might be putting on you a way of communicating that you could be detail oriented and deliberate that you might not like. So, completely opposite of me, this will suggest new ways. In our AI version of that, all I do is write my email, push up the button and it gets rewritten for Jason the way he likes to read information. So in one button it helps emails get rewritten the right way. 38% of emails today are misread, misunderstood, cause friction and you lose $20,000 a year from that. We fix that problem. Case You're in a virtual meeting and it'll tell you you're doing training.

Speaker 3:

It'll tell you how the group likes to learn or if one person likes to learn by pushing back and challenging with questions. You won't take that the wrong way. You'll see that that individual is. That's just how they learn. They want to ask questions. You might also see that one person might like to do self study versus others who like to work team and you might do a breakout that way.

Speaker 3:

If you're in a meeting and you need to influence somebody, it'll tell you that that person is deliberate and you're decisive. You might not want to push them on making a decision that meeting at the end. Ask them if they want to get back to you at the end. Many examples of that you can go into a meet every Monday. You get a meeting, a list of your meetings two days later and on Tuesday, two days later, and it'll say, hey, here are five meetings and it'll present to you those meetings and you click on one of those meetings in your calendar. It'll tell you the dynamics of that meeting and how to run that meeting better or that somebody might not speak up as they're shy and reflective, so how to be more inclusive and make those people feel like they belong? All of this at your fingertips as you're working, so it's mindless, you don't think about it, it just happens and it's part of your workflow and, like Grammarly, is changing the world to write better. We're changing the world to collaborate and be more emotionally intelligent and happier.

Speaker 2:

Every single case is like I'm looking at it as a therapist. So we're talking about emails and how many people in conversations of text are getting lost in translation and fights are happening and relationships are being broken up because someone read a text wrong, or there wasn't the right emoji, or there wasn't the right inflection and like, or it's not responded to a timely enough, right. And then take that on a corporate level where not only just emotions are being hurt, but billions of dollars of productivity can be lost and gained right Within this, within the wrong interpretation of an email, and I see how profound this can be. And I also like, as you're talking about this, right, you're looking at, like the five love languages, that's just another personality index and it's not like, oh well, I understand myself. That's what's really not only amazing, for what you're doing is to help people understand themselves, but also how do you interact with someone else based on their lens of seeing the world?

Speaker 2:

When you're saying that person is challenging, right, I'm right to see that person like, oh, they're not being an asshole. This is their way of showing that they're invested in this, this their way of making sure that they know that they're doing it the best that they can by asking questions and you may be like, oh well, what would he mean? Like I'm going to take this personally, that you don't like my ideas, or that you want to ask more questions and you think maybe you know, you might have that self doubt and you're being challenged by it. No, no, no, no.

Speaker 2:

That person just wants to make sure that they're doing the right and right to understand, and I think that's what's so amazing about what you guys are doing and creating. And when I took my exam right, my assessment, just as a cool, just so you know this right. So what I, when you're talking about like having it pop up on the screen, I want people to understand that there's like pictures of like different styles of like personality. So you have like the Maverick personality, which is like an airpilot, right, but they're they're really cool Glasses and goggles, right. So I came up as 48% Maverick, 31% creative, and there's a person picture drawing a painting.

Speaker 3:

They're mine.

Speaker 2:

I just put on the camera, oh okay, cool, so right, I have to figure out how to. Okay, maverick and okay, so you have the architect and the helper, right, and I got the promoter, which is so interesting because I realized that when I find something that I love, that makes my life healthier and happier, I want to share that with the world. And I also feel that, like even this podcast, what I said to you before we started was don't be shy and think that you talking about your company. I want you to promote this because this is something I believe in. So this is not shameless For me. It's not like shameless promotion. This is anybody who I'm sharing time with.

Speaker 2:

I want them to get their world, their word out, so, so it's interesting how impactful that is as a Maverick creative and as a promoter, especially when you're, you know, being a Maverick in creative ways right, so that aligns with me. And you have the Maverick, the architect. So the structure of creating things, putting things together and then help, using that to help people, is really, really powerful. Like that's what's so cool about this, right, people? If you're watching this on the video, you'll see one's, one of the avatars on the left of the screen and that will quick and remind you how to talk to him, how to how to connect with them and how to hear his words more impactfully. So that's like it's, it's fast, yeah.

Speaker 3:

At the end of the day, you can't have human connection without understanding each other first, and so we help you understand yourself, we help you understand others, and then the magic happens. That's where human connection in life happens. At work, we focus it on collaborating. We don't want human connection for dating at work, we want human connection for collaborating. But. But this tool can be applied in all senses, even outside of work, for families and for relationships.

Speaker 3:

And you know patient care we sell the hospitals to the chief patient care officer and customer experience and patient experience. Because when all your employees are working better together without friction, and people are not misunderstanding emails to from one department to another, you're not cutting off the wrong leg and doing surgery in the wrong leg, you're not giving the wrong medicine, patients aren't seeing nurses fighting, and so patient experience gets better. I mean, imagine the day you can order an Uber and pick a driver that you're really going to enjoy, right. If you don't want the driver speaking, you can pick that right. So connection from Uber drivers to. I've had to find nannies, and I had to meet 20 nannies to find one that my wife and I both like, and so all of this is around human connection. It's what makes the world and our experience in it goes around, and we help with that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I know I have a client that personally left a job in a hospital system because they weren't getting and able to have that influence and impact and weren't getting that reciprocal, that what they hoped that the department would be at by now before they even walked in the door and they weren't getting the hey, let me allow you to get there. And then because of that and that conflict in a system, he, this person, left and quit their job and it's a shame because this person is such a passionate person, right? And when you were talking about the idea of like money being what you said about that person.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I don't know how young they are, but what you just said is the biggest challenge to corporations today Gen Z's, millennials 64, 64% are looking to leave because they're not engaged and they're not connecting with their bosses and they're not connecting with the company and there's this lack of connection. And those Gen Z's and millennials are the future leaders of companies, and companies have their hands tied. They don't understand how to connect. This would go a long way to help with that group of people.

Speaker 2:

Right, it makes so much sense because what you have one of the things you and I were talking about is how much money is being wasted in coal, about culture and company.

Speaker 2:

So I want to touch a little bit on that right, because I know you have your, you really do have your finger on that poll so that and you've been in corporate America and you've been working with some major major companies. But let's, let's talk a little bit about that because you know, like you said, like you know you may have 15 people doing this but it hasn't trickle down effect. Or you know you might have a boss who's reading, you know any of the wonderful leadership books by John Maxwell, but it's like, but the buck stops there and no one else is really getting on. You know, on the same page, like they're not. They may give their team oh I want you to read this John Maxwell book but then there's no accountability and you know things create around it. So when you're saying, like culture in companies is wasting money, and you know, enhance, enhance a little bit of that from your perspective.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, for the last 20, 30 years, all the HBR articles and all the thought leadership around culture had this belief that culture is monolithic, that every company has one culture you know built to last. What's the culture to right? And you know there's a guy at Harvard Business School who went to MIT. His name's Don Sol S-U-L-L. Go look up his research. He's a culture index. Now, on the side from his academic publications, he looked at the Fortune 500, what they say are their values, slash their culture online. And then he did surveys of all the employees at those companies enough to be statistically significant and he found that, first of all, 90% of the Fortune 500 have four of the five same cultural values. So there's no way that 90% of companies have the same culture just off the bat, right. So it's ludicrous.

Speaker 2:

But what they claim their core values to be is very different.

Speaker 3:

Well, they claim their core. Most people claim their core values to be their culture Right and most state five. That's usually right. Four of the five are the same for 90% of the companies in the Fortune 500. Whether it's industrial, manufacturing, retail, google, like, they're all agile, they're all customer oriented. I mean it's all top down CEO and board saying what looks good, let's put it on the website and make people memorize it and if they can say it, that means that's our culture, right, right. And then they have turnover, unengaged people and like, and they're trying to manage to that when people aren't that right. Everything that Don Sol found was when they surveyed people at those 500 companies, they found that there's zero correlation in those five values at every one of those companies, meaning the companies think that that's what their culture is, but the employees don't think that those companies live any of those things. It's the most inch. It came out a year ago, this massive study and I it was laughable because I've been saying that now for seven years. With human intelligence we have the date on so many companies.

Speaker 3:

The reality is culture is not top down, culture is not monolithic. You don't have the same culture at Coca-Cola USA as Coca-Cola Brazil, coca-cola, china, right, and even at Starbucks, you don't have the same culture and the same job and the same barista role. And what leads a culture performance in Hialeah, where they're all Hispanic or Latin Spanish speaking people, spanish speaking customers? The culture performance there is the customer service person, the barista. They're going to come out from behind the counter. They're going to grab people's babies, kiss them, squeeze their cheeks of strangers, complete chair talk for 30 minutes, ask personal questions and it's a 35 minute experience to get your cafe latte and it's awesome customer service and their net promoter score is high and they are the best performing store in Starbucks in South Florida. You take that same group of baristas, those six people, and put them in battery park in New York city where the people are going off the wall street and they want a one minute experience. They don't want to talk to you and they don't want any kind of connection.

Speaker 2:

They want efficiency, they want quick.

Speaker 3:

That high performing culture of baristas in my name in Hialeah versus battery park would feel miserably and vice versa. And so it's ludicrous to say companies have one culture. It's even within the same job in the same company. And then the company spent millions of dollars on culture temperament studies are our employees happier or not? And they used to do it annually, then it was like six every six months, bi-annually and then it was monthly, and now it's almost like these pulse surveys every week. Oh my God, they're going down the wrong rabbit hole. That is such a waste of time and energy. You could have 100% of people loving the company, getting paid tons of money per hour, the best paid people. They think the company's the best, they'll recommend it to a friend and everybody thinks the company's awesome. And if it's a customer service oriented company in retail and they're the best paid retail employees and associates. But you actually don't have people who are customer oriented and all they do is care about making money, that company will lose all their sales, all their customers, they'll never come back and they will go out of business. Despite having high engagement survey results, and the best example is Microsoft and Apple have completely different true cultures. However, the engagement survey that they use is the same one and they actually have the same exact results, saying that 80% are really engaged, they love their company, 10% somewhat and 10% they hate the company. They thought it was different. That doesn't mean they have the same culture. Okay, an engagement survey. Happiness does not lead to performance. Okay, companies are so worried about the happiness of their employees they're missing the need to understand what we measure at human intelligence, for instance. Are we a group of mavericks? Do we have?

Speaker 3:

We worked with a restaurant up in Minnesota. 300 people was like the biggest restaurant in the city, was like a Chuck E Cheese in a Cheesecake Factory, and they were the best paid waiters and waitresses in the city. Yet their Yelp was one star. They would never get repeat business. People wouldn't come because they paid people really well. Those employees loved it and all their temperament studies. They were a great employer. The employees loved it. They were getting paid a ton of money.

Speaker 3:

They wanted to work there, but they were finding people who only care about making money, who were not service oriented, and so they were managing to the wrong thing. They came in with our tool and they said we only wanna hire people who are service oriented, sense of belonging, to create a culture of belonging. Who don't care about money okay. And who are problem solvers because you wanna wait or if you say, oh, can you take the ketchup on the side or can you, you want someone to go back and ask and not just know just whatever's on the menu, right? So service oriented and problem solvers that was what they said. So they used our tool to hire.

Speaker 3:

Within two months their Yelp scores went to three stars. Within six months they went to five stars. They put out two other restaurants out of business. It is now the number one restaurant in that city. Using our tool because they were measuring with temperament surveys the wrong things and with our survey and assessment, the right things. We want service oriented, problem solvers, not people who just wanna get paid good money and say that they're happy at our company.

Speaker 2:

What's so cool about that? And then like taking it back into different aspects of companies, or is that? Yeah, those would be the things that you're looking for in the direct to the customer facing side. Now you have the backend. You might have a chef that might need different traits, right, and then you have the management team that might need different traits. So it's not like this people think about like culture as like this, one size fits all and therefore we all need to fit into, like you know, that bubble but Every role at a company will have a different culture and every part of the world where that role exists will have a different culture of performance.

Speaker 3:

And now there's technology and there's tools like Human Intelligence. Actually that can answer that question what is the culture performance for this group, this team, this division? What is a culture of diversity of thought? How can we guarantee culture, ad and not continue to hire more of the same? Most clients we have are shocked that their teams are lopsided, with everyone who reflects the leader and looks and feels like the leader, and it's a vicious cycle. But when you have five people now who reflect the leader, let's say they're all decisive and self-starters. Well, when you bring up the person, when the person does the interview, who's not a self-starter? Who's not decisive? They're like oh no, that person sucked. Well, because they don't think and act like you. That doesn't mean they suck. You actually need someone to balance the team Right. So it's a self-fulfilling prophecy that people keep hiring who they like, not who's gonna add more problem solving and make a team more agile, more innovative.

Speaker 2:

And I think that's what like when we throw out these buzzwords right, the agile, right, like how many of those companies use that word right and they're saying right, and looking at it like from just from working with families and couples and then even working with my entrepreneur families or, you know, or on my businesses, that's, these things still apply to basic relationship dynamics at home. Right, You're a father, you're a husband, you're not just an entrepreneur, right, and what would it look like to have an agile marriage? What would it look like to have a right, Agile parenting style? Right, but what about taking into consideration your wife's personality and dispositions, your children's personality and dispositions, and how this is so universally empowered? Dude, you just nailed it.

Speaker 3:

The best. Parents will bring up child A, child B, child C differently, because child A, child B, child C need different ways of being managed, of being incentivized, being motivated, of being nourished. Just like a boss, a leader needs to manage every employee differently. Every employee needs and when I was promoting product ramble, I mean they knocked into my head like Juan, now that you're the boss, now that you're a brand manager, you have five people pointing to you.

Speaker 3:

It gets exponentially more difficult. Well, I go, why? Now I have a budget, I can tell people what to do. They're like no, you've already missed the point. Now you need to change. Before, bosses were changing for you you didn't know it the good ones. Now you need to change for every subordinate you have. You need to learn to listen differently, to motivate differently and to act differently for every subordinate. That's what makes a great leader and that's what makes great management. And it kind of hit me in the face. I'm like, oh, that sucks, I have to change for everybody else, even though I'm the boss. Ego goes down, service goes up. Parents need to learn that same lesson and it's a challenge because that means being agile and a tool like ours helps you understand that for an individual, for a team, for a group. But most people don't have tools like ours and most companies aren't like Proctoring Amble.

Speaker 2:

So I know we have a hard stop in two minutes. So my last question before obviously we throw it all the ways in which people can connect with you and obviously this is part one of hopefully continued conversations is what right now are you reading or listening to that? You are getting a lot of value from that. You would love other people to kind of put in front of their eyes and listen to in here and that's impacting you and uplifting you and informing you that to be a more complete human being, so I'm going to take a different tact here, please, and not do a business thing, although this will help everyone with their business.

Speaker 3:

It will help everyone with their business, it doesn't have to be business. Yeah, perfect. So three things, thank you. Everyone should read a book called Journey of Souls. Get past page 30, because up until 30, you're going to be like this is crazy woo-woo magic. After page 30, you'll see why I'm recommending this book. I've read a lot of books in my life. There's no greater book to teach you about life and why we're here than that book, and it also explains your relationships with every person in your life the Journey of Souls. Buy that book. Don't buy version two or three, part two or three. Just buy the one that was done in 1990. So that's one. Two learn about a guy named Joe Dispenza.

Speaker 2:

Yep Love Joe.

Speaker 3:

I think it's a good first step into the connection of being the best version of yourself with spirituality, in a way that's not kind of scary, offensive or weird. So, joe Dispenza, learn about this person. And then, third, learn about ayahuasca, not as something to fix people, but something to get to whatever next level you as an individual need to get to, because this is the greatest tool that the universe put on this planet for self-development, for consciousness, for understanding, and to reduce that voice in your head which is not your friend, which is an ego voice that lives in fear and scarcity. This will be able to give you the ability to live in pure abundance, joy and happiness at a high vibration. Not all the time, I'm not. We're still human, but we're still human, but much more often than anybody else. Who's never done ayahuasca Love it.

Speaker 2:

To be continued Great.

Speaker 3:

Thank you, thanks, jason, so much for having me today.

Speaker 2:

We will, absolutely everybody else. Please, please check out humanintelligencecom If we're going to put all the notes in the link and how to reach out to Juan if you have any questions about how to connect with the company. And again, Juan, thank you so much and very much looking forward to our online and offline conversations in the future. Awesome. Thanks so much, jason. Thanks, brother. We'll talk to you soon.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the U winning life podcast.

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